UIL Academic Events

  • EJMSMS participates in the district UIL Academic Meet each year. UIL Academic participation gives students a chance to excel in academic areas such as math, writing, science, speech, art, social studies. Some events are timed tests while others are creative. Continued participation in UIL Academic events through the high school years offers students a chance to earn scholarships if they progress to the state contest level. Below is a description of the contests offered for participation. Due to redistricting, new events may be added, and others dropped. Those changes will be announced as soon as we are aware of them. We welcome all those interested to sign-up and listen for announcements for further information.

    Music Memory (6 ONLY) - Students study fine pieces of music literature taken from a wide spectrum of music genres to expose students to great composers, their lives and their music. In the course of preparing for the contest, students should be given the opportunity to describe and analyze the music, relate the music to history, to society and to culture, and to evaluate musical performance.

    General Mathematics (6-8) -- Learning to quickly complete math problems is a valuable skill in all facets of life including engineering, accounting, completing a tax return and even grocery shopping.  Students have 30 minutes to answer 50 multiple choice questions covering math from algebra to geometry.

    Calculator Applications (6-8) – The calculator applications contest is designed to stimulate the development of mathematical and calculator skills.  Goals are both intellectual and practical: developing mathematical reasoning and knowledge and requiring the application of problem- solving skills toward realistic problems.  The contest is a 30 minute, 80 problem,  fill in the blank test.

    Number Sense (6-8) – Being able to perform quick mathematical calculations is the premise behind this contest.  The test covers functions appropriate for the grade level, including algebra and geometry.  Students are given 10 minutes to complete the fill in the blank test.

    Ready Writing (6-8) – Given up to two hours to write an essay on one of two topics, ready writing helps students refine their writing abilities.  This contest helps them to learn to write clearly and correctly a paper that is interesting and original, regardless of the topic area.

    Prose (6-8) – Students prepare to read a piece of prose out loud, learning to analyze the text as a literary critic, to grow and to develop as a performer, to communicate a message to an audience and to perform and artistic creation.  All of these apply to the prose competition which should be an extension of classroom literary and language activities in short stories and children’s fiction.

    Poetry (6-8) – Students prepare to read a piece of poetry out loud, learning to analyze the text as a literary critic, to grow and to develop as a performer, to communicate a message to an audience and to perform and artistic creation.  All of these apply to the poetry competition which should be an extension of classroom literary and language activities in poetry.

    Spelling (6-8) – The spelling contest is designed to give students exposure to a wide variety of vocabulary words.  It is not a contest of memorization.  For the most educational value, preparation for this contest should include instruction in the rules of the English language, meanings, and definitions, and root words.  Depending on their grade level, students must spell between 65 and 140 words in 30 – 60 minutes

    Dictionary Skills (6-8) – Thorough knowledge of the dictionary is a way to increase a student’s ability to find the information that is needed for classwork as well as everyday living.  The subject matter of all tests is taken form Merriam Webster’s Intermediate Dictionary.  Students are given 20 minutes to answer 40 objective and short-answer questions.

    Listening Skills (6-8) – The listening contest helps students recognize the importance of effective listening skills and to identify problems they may in listening effectively, a skill they will need throughout their lives.  Students are read a script 7-10 minutes long and then must answer 25 objective questions.

    Art (6-8) – The art contest involves the study of paintings from the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC and paintings from Texas art galleries and museums.  As part of their study, students will demonstrate an understanding of art history, interpret ideas and moods in original artworks and make informed judgments about artwork.  The contest consists of an identification section.

    Maps, Graphs & Charts (6-8) – The maps, graphs, and charts contest is designed to help students learn to get information from world maps, pie charts, bar charts and local area maps.  The 75 question objective test that students must complete in 45 minutes measures skills such as using a reference book to locate information, making comparisons, estimating and approximating, using scale and interpreting legends and keys.

    Chess (6-8) – Chess puzzle competition is very different from tournament chess play. Contestants in a chess puzzle contest receive a paper-and-pencil test that includes a series of chess boards with pieces in particular positions. Questions are based on analysis of material or possible moves in each given diagram.

    Social Studies (6-8) – The focus of social studies test is knowledge of historical facts and major documents.  The test covers (in varying amount) Texas, United States & World histories.  The 30 minute, 40 question contest is designed to test knowledge and the ability to critically think about social studies  and historical/social concepts.  Based on the TEKS for social studies and content taken from state adopted text books and identified primary sources

    Modern Oratory (7-8) – In modern oratory, the contestant will select one of five topics, determine the critical issues in the topic, and determine and acknowledge both pro and con points citing support discovered in their research.  Students will decide which side they will defend and support that side in a three- to six-minute speech with additional evidence.

    Impromptu Speaking (7-8) – Impromptu speaking provides opportunities for students to organize ideas; to prepare and deliver speeches on different types of topics; to evaluate speeches given by others; and to develop self-confidence.  From a set of topics, students are given three minutes to prepare one speech no longer than five minutes.

    Science (7-8) – Emphasis for the science contests is placed on knowledge of scientific fact, understanding of scientific principles and the ability to think through scientific problems.  The 45 minute, 35 question contest is designed to test knowledge and the ability to critically think about science and scientific concepts.  Test content is specifically correlated to the TEKS curriculum.